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  • Texas Bill Prohibiting Male Masturbation Moves Closer To Becoming Law

    APRIL 8, 2017 BY MICHAEL STONE

    A proposed bill in Texas that would impose a fine for male masturbation is making its way through the state’s legislature.

    House Bill 4260, called the “Man’s Right to Know Act,” would punish male masturbation with a $100 fine, and require men who want Viagra to be subject to a rectal exam.

    The bill, filed earlier this year by Texas legislator Rep. Jessica Farrar (D), was referred to the House State Affairs Committee on Tuesday.

    By focusing on male masturbation, the proposed legislation is an obvious attempt to satirize and draw attention to the unreasonable and dangerous policy proposals concerning women’s reproductive freedom coming from the Republican Party.

    Commenting on her bill, Rep. Farrar told mysanantonio.com:

    A lot of people find the bill funny. What’s not funny are the obstacles that Texas women face every day, that were placed there by legislatures making it very difficult for them to access healthcare.

    Farrar is a vocal abortion rights activist, with a long record of opposing legislation in Texas hostile to women’s reproductive freedom.

    The Statesman reports the details of the new legislation prohibiting unregulated male masturbation:

    The bill calls “masturbatory emissions” an “act against an unborn child, and failing to preserve the sanctity of life.”

    The bill also contains provisions that would also put restrictions on vasectomies, Viagra prescriptions and colonoscopies, including:

    • The state must create an informational booklet called “A Man’s Right to Know” that contains information and illustrations on the benefits of and concerns about those three treatments. A man must review the booklet before going through with any of them.
    • A man must receive a rectal exam and an MRI of his rectum before any of the three treatments.
    • A man would not be able sue a doctor for refusing to provide those treatments or another procedure if the procedure violates the doctor’s “personal, moralistic, or religious beliefs.”
    • A doctor must obtain consent from the man before providing the treatment, and the man may give it only if he waits at least 24 hours after the doctor’s visit.
    • The state must establish a registry of nonprofit organizations and hospitals that provide abstinence counseling, a supervising physician for “masturbatory emissions,” and semen storage.
    • “Masturbatory emissions” must be stored for the wife for conception.

    The Statesman also notes that current state law “requires that doctors distribute to women considering an abortion the ‘A Woman’s Right to Know’ booklet, which contains illustrations of gestational periods and the risks and side effects of abortions. Women also must wait 24 hours after receiving the booklet and must undergo an ultrasound before the procedure. Abortion of a viable fetus can bring a penalty of at least five years in prison.”

    Earlier this week former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton praised Farrar for promoting the proposed new legislation.  After praising Farrar while speaking at an Annie’s List luncheon in Houston on Friday, Clinton opined:

    I don’t know. The bill may be satirical but the message sure resonated.

    Bottom line: Turnabout is fair play. By focusing on male masturbation House Bill 4260 demonstrates the absurdity and cruelty of the constant and ongoing effort by Republicans to demean and stigmatize women in their pursuit of reproductive health care.

    Texas State Capitol (Image via Wikipedia)
    Texas State Capitol (Image via Wikipedia)



  • Fox News host Pete Hegseth comes clean? I do wash my hands

    Ben Tobin,USA TODAYFebruary 11, 2019

    Fox News host Pete Hegseth says all the handwringing on Twitter about the fact he doesn’t wash his hands was much ado about nothing.

    On Fox and Friends Sunday morning, Hegseth told his co-hosts, Ed Henry and Jedediah Bila, that he didn’t believe in the sanitary activity. The admission was prompted by Bila calling out Hegseth for eating leftover day-old pizza on the set.

    “My 2019 resolution is to say things on-air that I say off-air,” Hegseth said to his co-hosts. “‘I don’t think I’ve washed my hands for 10 years.”

    As Henry and Bila laughed at this proclamation, Hegseth doubled down: “I inoculate myself,” he said. “Germs are not a real thing. I can’t see them; therefore, they’re not real.”

    However, Fox News spokesperson Jaclyn Giuliano told USA TODAY that Hegseth “was joking,” pointing to a Twitter chain between Hegseth and MSNBC host Chris Hayes.

    Hayes replied to a video of Hegseth’s comments by saying “he’s….pretty clearly joking?” Hegseth retweeted Hayes’s post, adding, “When even @chrislhayes can see the obvious…Twitter really has come full circle.”

    Pete Hegseth@PeteHegseth

    When even @chrislhayes can see the obvious…Twitter really has come full circle.Chris Hayes@chrislhayesReplying to @atrupar @PeteHegsethhe’s….pretty clearly joking?41010:22 AM – Feb 11, 2019Twitter Ads info and privacy298 people are talking about this

    Previously, Hegseth commented on Twitter about hand washing. Following a tweet by user @smittymhs’s defending the Fox News host, Hegseth retweeted the post, adding “#DontWash.”

    Pete Hegseth@PeteHegseth

    #DontWashSmittymhs@smittymhs@PeteHegseth I’m with you on hand washing. I’m almost 70 and haven’t had a cold or flu in years. Our bodies need some germs to learn how to fight them. Too many germofobes out there.72211:47 AM – Feb 10, 2019Twitter Ads info and privacy961 people are talking about this

    Still, Hegseth says it should have been obvious that he was joking. “We’re on a show and we have fun and we banter and I’m like, eh, you know, maybe I haven’t washed my hands for 10 years,” he told USA TODAY. “If you look at Ed and Jedediah’s reaction, they are laughing like we are (on) every show.”

    Hegseth says the joke is a call-out to germ obsessors to lighten up. “My half-hearted commentary to the point is, we live in a society where people walk around with bottles of Purell in their pockets, and they sanitize 19,000 times a day as if that’s going to save their life,” he said. “I take care of myself and all that, but I don’t obsess over everything all the time.”

    The whole episode is a signal about how the Twitterverse can overreact, he says.

    After the incident got attention, Hegseth said he was “sitting back and literally watching my (Twitter) feed and laughing. It’s ridiculous to me because of how people take literal and serious certain things and their heads explode. It’s ridiculous.”

    Added Hegseth: “The next thing that will happen they are going to be calling my biology professor at Princeton (and ask) ‘When Pete was a student in your class, did he believe germs were real?’ So dumb.”

    For the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, washing your hands is no laughing matter. As the nation’s health protection agency notes, 1 gram of human feces, which is about the weight of a paper clip, can contain 1 trillion germs.

    The CDC states that the routine washing of hands with soap and clean, running water is crucial in battling against sickness and the spread of diseases.

    If you stop washing your hands, it will have an effect on your health and the health of others around you, according to Jamin Brahmbhatt, a physician at Orlando Health.

    “Washing your hands is the easiest way to protect yourself and others from spreading bugs that can live on your hands,” Brahmbhatt previously told USA TODAY. “We can get germs on our hands by touching other parts of our body, sneezing or coughing, touching other people or things like animals or meat.”

    Contributing: Mike Snider

    Pete Hegseth is currently a Fox News host.
    Pete Hegseth is currently a Fox News host.

    Follow USA TODAY intern Ben Tobin on Twitter: @TobinBen

    This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Fox News host Pete Hegseth comes clean? I do wash my hands


  • Zombie deer disease (chronic wasting disease) is infection in deer, moose, elk It causes dramatic weight loss, loss of coordination, and increased aggression As of January, CDC says it’s been reported in 24 US states, two Canada provinces By

    CHEYENNE MACDONALD FOR DAILYMAIL.COM PUBLISHED: 17:01 EST, 7 February 2019 | UPDATED: 19:42 EST, 7 February 2019

    A deadly infection that’s come to be known as ‘zombie deer disease’ is spreading across North America, a new report warns.

    Formally called chronic wasting disease, the illness attacks the brain, spinal cord, and other tissues in deer, elk, and moose.

    It eventually leads to death – but, not before causing the animal to dramatically lose weight and coordination, and become aggressive.

    According to the CDC, the disease was reported in at least 24 states in the US and two Canadian provinces as of January 2019, up two states since last year.

    A deadly infection that’s come to be known as ‘zombie deer disease’ is spreading across North America, a new report warns. Formally called chronic wasting disease, the illness attacks the brain, spinal cord, and other tissues in deer, elk, and moose. File photo

    A deadly infection that’s come to be known as ‘zombie deer disease’ is spreading across North America, a new report warns. Formally called chronic wasting disease, the illness attacks the brain, spinal cord, and other tissues in deer, elk, and moose. File photo

    WHAT IS ‘ZOMBIE DEER DISEASE’? 

    As of January 2019, Chronic wasting disease (CWD), also known as ‘zombie deer disease,’ has been reported in 24 US states and two Canadian provinces.

    The infection attacks the brain, spinal cord, and other tissues in deer, elk, and moose, resulting in dramatic weight loss, lack of coordination, and even aggression before they eventually die.

    There is no evidence yet that it can infect humans, and no such cases have been reported, according to the CDC. 

    But, a recent study found macaques could get the disease after consuming infected meat, sparking fears that a variant that also infects humans could eventually emerge.

    Officials are urging precaution to minimize any potential risks.

    Though warnings over ‘zombie deer disease’ over the past few years have caused many to draw parallels to the mad cow epidemic, there’s so far no evidence that people can be harmed by infected meat.

    The disease was first spotted in the wild roughly 40 years ago, but has been seen in captive deer as far back as the late 1960s.

    It blossomed primarily in northern Colorado and southern Wyoming, and has been spreading outward since, according to the CDC.

    ‘Since 2000, the area known to be affected by CWD in free-ranging animals has increased to at least 24 states, including states in the Midwest, Southwest, and limited areas on the East Coast,’ the CDC says.

    ‘It is possible that CWD may also occur in other states without strong animal surveillance systems, but that cases haven’t been detected yet.

    ‘Once CWD is established in an area, the risk can remain for a long time in the environment. The affected areas are likely to continue to expand.’

    Chronic wasting disease can be found in both free-ranging and farmed animals, and is known to have horrifying effects on those it infects – but, it can be years before an animal begins to show signs.Learn about dangerous chronic wasting or ‘zombie deer’ diseaseLoaded: 0%Progress: 0%0:56PreviousPlaySkipUnmuteCurrent Time0:56/Duration Time3:36FullscreenSHARE THISMORE VIDEOS

    The disease earned its nickname from the bizarre symptoms it causes, including a vacant stare and exposed ribs as it causes the animal to physically waste away.

    While it’s not yet known to be transmissible to humans, a recent study found for the first time that macaques could get the disease after consuming infected meat, sparking fears that a variant targeting humans could soon emerge.

    According to the CDC, the disease has now been reported in at least 24 states in the continental US and two Canadian provinces, up two states since last year. Areas with reports of the disease are shown in red 

    According to the CDC, the disease has now been reported in at least 24 states in the continental US and two Canadian provinces, up two states since last year. Areas with reports of the disease are shown in red 

    A separate study found that laboratory mice with some human genes could become infected, according to the CDC.

    So far, though, it’s limited only to the hoofed mammals and its occurrence remains ‘relatively low’ nationwide.

    But, it’s slowly and steadily spreading.

    ‘In several locations where the disease is established, infection rates may exceed 10 percent (1 in 10), and localized infection rates of more than 25 percent (1 in 4) have been reported,’ the CDC report says.

    ‘The infection rates among some captive deer can be much higher, with a rate of 79% (nearly 4 in 5) reported from at least one captive herd.’